Customer Experience Management vs. Self-Orientation

January 3, 2006

“The best companies find ways to tune in to customers’ voices every day,” The Three “Ds” of Customer Experience

Focusing on how to engage customers in dialogue, how to converse with customers is among the greatest challenges, and opportunities, facing companies today. Conversing with customers requires a focus on their experience with existing products and services as well as the design of new ones. It means developing business processes to deliver products and services that are not self-oriented, but customer-oriented; not inside-out, but outside-in.

Customer Experience Management (CEM) is a term used by many people to describe the methods for developing customer-orientation instead of self-orientation in business processes. CEM is one of those terms offering something to lots of different people. As a result, it is sometimes confused with the very services it claims to offer management advice on applying. A recent series of posts on LivePath provide an interesting discussion on what makes CEM different from CRM, User Experience Design, and Experiential Marketing. If you employ these buzz words in describing the services your company offers, I strongly encourage a close reading of these posts by Leigh Duncan. Although I might quibble with some of the distinctions made within each functional area of CEM that Leigh outlines, the overall strategy for making sense of what CEM offers is sound.

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Everyone Doesn’t Love the IPod

January 2, 2006

Three of the four people in my household own an IPod, with yours truly the only holdout. I love what the device does, but since I first toyed with my wife’s, I’ve been reluctant to buy my own. Why? Well, I just found it cumbersome to use without knowing exactly the reasons. Finally, someone who uses one on a regular basis took the time to think about why people like me find IPods too difficult to use. Thanks to Mobile Community Design for their analysis of the issue.